Weisgerber

Anne Weisgerber discusses and reads her flash fiction piece She Curled Tight for Long Exposure Magazine.

For more flash fiction like this, purchase Issue 4 of Long Exposure Magazine here.

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Gabriel Rosenstock on Haiku

Gabriel Rosenstock discusses the  philosophy of Haiku and the ability of the form to disrupt everyday ways of seeing and thinking.

‘Emptiness’, his collaborative work with American Photographer Ron Rosenstock, is out now from Long Exposure Press.

New From Long Exposure Press

emptiness_cover_2

£4.99 (Digital Edition)

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‘Through photography I have sought to explore the space between the finite and the infinite. For me, infrared photography is on the borderline, the veil between the known and the unknown … a search for what is beyond the doorway of perception. What draws me—what speaks to me—is the mystery …’

– Ron Rosenstock

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2 Years of Publishing

Long Exposure Magazine has now been publishing for 2 years!

During this time the magazine has been fortunate enough to publish a fantastic range of poetry, photography, visual art and critical work from around the world. Many thanks to each contributor and reader who has been involved so far.

Issue 4 will add sharp and engaging short fiction to this output, featuring more writers and artists than any previous issue.

These are exciting times as we look to expand the magazine and above all promote high-quality creative work and those who are producing it.

 

Poetry Tutoring at Long Exposure

Long Exposure Magazine is now offering feedback and guidance on a selection of your poetry. For an introductory fee of £10 you will receive rigorous feedback and editorial advice on a set of up to 5 poems through e-mail correspondence.

Editor Daniel Williams holds undergraduate and postgraduate degrees in literature and creative writing and has published poetry widely on-line and in print, including at Cadaverine, Ink, Sweat, And Tears, and Envoi. Alongside his work in editing and publishing, he has experience of teaching creative writing in a variety of contexts, from local community to university level.

Make your payment below and the editor will contact you to receive your work and begin your tutoring session. Any enquiries can be sent to editor@longexposuremagazine.com.


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Call for Submissions: Illustrations

Further opportunities at Long Exposure Magazine.
Long Exposure is looking to put together a list of artists to work with frequently who can respond to the writing published in the magazine, through painting/illustration, photography and other visual art forms, to be featured alongside the creative writing pieces in each issue. This is an opportunity for regular publication and promotion. If you are interested in this project please contact editor@longexposuremagazine.com with a brief introduction and a sample of your work or links to some examples. You can see the type of work the magazine has published so far here.

Readings from Issue 3, by Keith Moul

Hear Keith Moul read four prose poems featured in Issue 3.

To read Keith’s work along the photography they respond to, access Issue 3 here.

Long Exposure Issue 4: Call for Submissions

For the next issue, Long Exposure is opening up submissions to fiction, specifically very short fiction of 700 words or less. In previous issues we explored traditional short forms such as the haiku (Issue 2), and how an economy of language and sharpness of observation can heighten the impact on the reader by using a minimum of words.

Definitions for this type of fiction are various, and as such our criteria are broad. Whether your pieces lean towards a fluid and poetic style or want to focus on delivering an engaging narrative in a tight space, we would love to read your work.

As usual we are open to poetry submissions on any style or theme, but with a particular interest in the Ekphrastic genre or work which combines text and image, as well as to photography and art work and collaborative projects between writers and artists.

See previous issues for the type of work we have published to date.

If you have an idea for an essay or article, particularly on the relationship between creative writing and the visual arts, contemporary poetry and poetics, or the arts in education and society, contact the author to discuss.

All submissions and enquiries to: editor@longexposuremagazine.com

Full submissions guidelines.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Long Exposure Magazine, Issue 3 Now Available

The new edition of Long Exposure Magazine is now available!

Featuring an international selection of new creative writing, photography and visual art.

Access it here:

Long Exposure Magazine, Issue 3, July, 2016.

LE 3 New

The Inking of a Story: A New Poem by Jane R. Rogers

First the stars
blocked in canary yellow
the stars are made of glass

next the mountains
deckled cool blue, an organic horizon
the mountains hiss of fear

next the desert
dunes ruched in ochre red shadows
the desert is the story of landscape

then a pitched tent – last onto the paper
solid night silhouette
secure enough to withstand a storm

where we recline on foreign bedding and listen in
to the unprinted white spaces and
ink the future.

For more of Jane’s work keep updated with Long Exposure Magazine, Issue 3, forthcoming.

Four Prose Poems by Keith Moul

Bolts and Woodgrain

Look out from the observation platform at Washington Pass.  The view’s the thing!  Mountains ranged before the glowing light, mountains before the wind; mountains after all that wind, that to the eye, resist encroaching trees.  Yet for some the weathering wood, sturdy retainer, and bolted steel at close perspective, assuring notice to the orange and black stain, graying from snow and rain, growth rings insistent as annual pleas, draw our focus, demand our first consideration now, during light, during clarity, during rare peace among those rocks seemingly indifferent to ice.

moul 1

Restraint

Ferry car deck serves as temporary road, dumping dark waves of Puget Sound aside, waves that spray the sturdy car-trap, with yellow rope reminding careless passengers that danger in a lurch, catastrophe in a lunge, eternity at depths with fishes for company.  So the highway waddles through whitecaps; fights light that escapes enveloping clouds; cherishes sun serving as spotlight for an audience of trees on the dark shore, danger and entertainment both; jilts passengers’ eyes straining for known landmarks, signs of the journey’s continuance; relieves those bobbing in desperation for deposit at the dock where the boat will shudder after coupling, revving its anticipation for return to Keystone.

moul 2

Schoolbus

The search (which I shouldn’t have to explain) never ceases.  In this case, partially obscured beneath lacey cedars, light haloes its past usefulness; light surrenders to closing darkness children no longer served in remote Marblemount.  The search exposes epiphany: raw transformation of weeds and invading mosses compel display of the human condition, while behind this point of timely view, out of sight, but detectable by the ear, the Skagit River surges, propelling hurried rocks in their slow conversion from a Cascade peak into silt proceeding in perfect accord with natural law toward future compactions.

Moul 3

Driftwood

The whole point of such objects is mystery: a tree survives peculiarly from its own time, its own space, no known context, no comradeship in wood, no causes before gods, no election to elite membership, only sad credibility that buoyancy prevails, currents and tides obliged to the moon arbitrate.  Then to persist here on a shore, a fireless dragon guarding time, like a white bone completing a duty with dignity as though in a palace arbor.

Moul 4

Two Poems by Dairena Ní Chinnéide

Green Rockpool

Photography by Dairena Ní Chinnéide

Departure

Like shedding skin
fragments are packed up
shards of sanctuary disappear
the cottage dishes are washed
bags negotiate themselves
in a form of farewell.

I sit in this artists retreat
observing beauty peeking out of a Lidil’s bag
almost completed paintings
of a desire
as transitory as the brushstroke
the intentional randomness
of a splattered and empty easel.

Colours echo more than sound
or the potential of memory
from the artistry within us
swallowed gulps of gaiety
a whole moon on a shoulder
the palette of parting
still wet in cracks of stone.

Flying the Coop

flown coop,
a wall
between emptiness.

space expands
in this narrow
house

I do not inhabit,
just resting,
conjuring my nest.

aloneness
blares,
digitally enhanced,

oneness
breathes personality,
comet risen;

I blossom
by dim light
in my bed,

loverless,
ecstatically naked,
like water.

purified silence
delves in, I live alone,
alive.

Long Exposure Magazine: Front Cover Opportunity

Long Exposure Logo

For our next issue, Long Exposure Magazine is seeking photography or visual art based on the theme of ‘Movement’. The representation of movement, such as the play of light, the movement of animals or the actions of figures, have been a long standing preoccupation for the techniques of creative writing and the visual arts. The theme is open to new possibilities and can be interpreted in any way you choose.

A selected image or art work will then be chosen to feature as the front cover of Long Exposure Issue 3. Submissions to: editor@longexposuremagazine.com
As always, we look forward to viewing your work!

To view the type of work we have featured to date, read our previous issues here.

For the latest updates on the progress of the magazine and to view new content, support Long Exposure on social media:

Twitter: @longexposuremag
Facebook: Long Exposure Magazine

Long Exposure Magazine, Issue 3: Call for Submissions

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Submissions are now open for our third issue!
So far, the magazine has been fortunate enough to engage with and publish fascinating collaborations between creative writing and the visual arts, and we continue our interest in this type of project, whatever media is involved. We are always open to new projects being brought to our attention, and if you feel your work may be suitable for publication in the magazine or would like to enquire further then don’t hesitate to contact the main e-mail address at: editor@longexposuremagazine.com.
Alongside direct collaboration between art forms, the magazine continues to publish striking and innovative contemporary poetry, photography and other visual art in its own right, from practitioners at any stage of their careers. You can view our general submissions guidelines here: https://longexposuremagazine.com/submissions/
Both previous issues can be accessed online and free of charge, so if you have an interest in this field and would like to see the style and range of previously published work, we would greatly appreciate your support in reading Long Exposure’s output to date.
We look forward to receiving your work, and to continuing to explore the possibilities for contemporary arts.

To keep up to date with the progress of the magazine and our activities, follow Long Exposure on social media:

Facebook: Long Exposure Magazine

Twitter: @longexposuremag

Long Exposure Magazine, Issue 2: Digital Release

The new edition of Long Exposure Magazine is ready! Featuring an internationally diverse range of creative work in a variety of forms. Access it here: http://joom.ag/g6Ob

Long Exposure Cover 2

Please enjoy the issue and share!

Support Long Exposure on social media:

Facebook: Long Exposure Magazine

Twitter: @longexposuremagazine

Long Exposure Magazine, Issue 2, Upcoming Release

Long Exposure Logo
The second issue of Long Exposure Magazine will be made available online from this Friday, 19th June.

The edition is focused on a variety of eastern poetic and artistic forms, and features the collaborative work of Ron Rosenstock and Gabriel Rosenstock, combining haiku and photography, a sequence based on the art of Hiroshige, several examples of Haiga art work, visual poetry and more.

Keep updated here at the Long Exposure website, or follow the project on social media:

Facebook: Long Exposure Magazine

Twitter: @longexposuremagazine

Negro Quarter, Tupelo, Mississippi, March 1936: A New Poem by William Doreski

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Negro Quarter, Tupelo, Mississippi, March 1936

The barn-slab of board and batten
must be a house: tin roof propped
above the porch, four over four
window, wood shingles clumsy
as a mouthful of store-bought teeth.
The whole thing slants to the left,

toward a courthouse white against white sky.
The slim black man in neat black suit
leaning against the building’s tilt
holds the entire scene together.
Beyond him, a small clapboard shack,
a few twists of wire, and the long wall

well beyond which the courthouse looms.
But where is the black man looking?
What’s around the corner and why
doesn’t he acknowledge the camera,
an eight by ten Deardorff, pointed
squarely between his shoulder blades?

You’d think anyone in Tupelo
in 1936 would sense
the threat, the long lens piercing
otherwise impassable distance
to center this man in a city
he may have little cause to love.

Bio: William Doreski’s work has appeared in various online and print journals as well as in several collections, most recentlyThe Suburbs of Atlantis (AA Press, 2013). This poem is part of a larger sequence based on the photography of Walker Evans. To read more of William Doreski’s work keep updated on the progress of the forthcoming issue:

Facebook: Long Exposure Magazine

Twitter: @longexposuremag

Long Exposure Cover

Provisional cover for the upcoming issue, featuring Haiga art work by Gabriel Rosenstock and Ion Codrescu. Submissions for our Eastern poetic forms specialism as well as other textual and visual work remain open. See our submissions guidelines for further details.

‘Remember’: A New Haiku by Tracey Walsh

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Personal effects
repatriated jumble
remains remaindered

Part of Long Exposure’s ‘Looking Back’ project for National Poetry Day.

Bio: Tracey Walsh has recently had work featured in Long Exposure. She tells us about the background to this poem:

Walter Walker (an uncle of my dad, also Walter Walker) enlisted in the army in 1915, aged 17 (he told them he was 19). He was killed in action in France on 14 April 1917. The image shows one of several documents, found when researching the family tree, that deal with the ‘admin’ of his death. Another form sent to his mother, Harriett, asked her to choose a personal inscription for his gravestone in the war cemetery in France (We Shall Meet Again).
Four of Harriett’s children served in the Great War. Walter’s brother, Edward, died a year to the day after him, 14 April 1918. He has no grave, personal effects or admin forms, just his name inscribed on a memorial stone at Loos, France.

Looking Back: For National Poetry Day

In preparation for National Poetry Day (2nd October) Long Exposure is drawing on the theme of ‘remember’, requesting submissions of new work in response to photographs or images which document history, both personal and otherwise, and which allow a shift from the present into another space or time. We feel strongly that there is a depth and variety to images, especially those of our past, which is able to bring something unique to light. We are invested in the value of poetry and believe in its capacity to make concrete the experience of remembering, of being taken back, of recording or re-recording our impressions or responses. Our histories can provide luminous material for poetry, and it is the writing of this which we wish to encourage and bring forward, as well as the links between picture and word.
Poems are welcome in any style or form, although they should adhere to the standard submissions guidelines. As always if the image which has inspired a particular piece is available we would love to see how it and the text are interacting, so please send them too; otherwise we would welcome some further context to gain an insight into what encouraged the writing, and why it matters to you.
All submissions can be sent to editor@longexposuremagazine.com. A selection of submissions will appear on our sites as part of our engagement with National Poetry Day.

‘You should always be taking pictures, if not with a camera then with your mind.’- Isaac Marion

A New Haiku by Tracey Walsh

Webbed garden spider
strung badminton net fashion
your luncheon is served

Bio: Tracey Walsh has been enjoying life since early retirement in 2013. Indulging a lifelong love of crime fiction by starting a book review blog, she has also discovered a new interest in photographing local Lancashire countryside and wildlife. This is Tracey’s first attempt at poetry since school days.

Broken Things: A New Poem by Bill LaBrie

Broken Things

I champion the broken things:
Old-town busted concrete aprons
In front of renamed stores.
The quiet, soft, lurking decay
Slowly overcoming the catalogs left
On the floor of the abandoned ranch.
This is the straightening of the line:
The gentle, slow return to mean as
“New” and “improved” fade.

Continue reading “Broken Things: A New Poem by Bill LaBrie”