Gabriel Rosenstock on Haiku

Gabriel Rosenstock discusses the  philosophy of Haiku and the ability of the form to disrupt everyday ways of seeing and thinking.

‘Emptiness’, his collaborative work with American Photographer Ron Rosenstock, is out now from Long Exposure Press.

Emptiness: Reviewed by Philip Gross

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‘The richness of this book lies not in any one person’s contribution, but in the fertile space between them – between word and image, between languages, between word and silence, between landscape and light.’

Continue reading “Emptiness: Reviewed by Philip Gross”

New From Long Exposure Press

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£4.99 (Digital Edition)

Preview and Buy Now.

‘Through photography I have sought to explore the space between the finite and the infinite. For me, infrared photography is on the borderline, the veil between the known and the unknown … a search for what is beyond the doorway of perception. What draws me—what speaks to me—is the mystery …’

– Ron Rosenstock

Continue reading “New From Long Exposure Press”

Poetry Tutoring at Long Exposure

Long Exposure Magazine is now offering feedback and guidance on a selection of your poetry. For an introductory fee of £10 you will receive rigorous feedback and editorial advice on a set of up to 5 poems through e-mail correspondence.

Editor Daniel Williams holds undergraduate and postgraduate degrees in literature and creative writing and has published poetry widely on-line and in print, including at Cadaverine, Ink, Sweat, And Tears, and Envoi. Alongside his work in editing and publishing, he has experience of teaching creative writing in a variety of contexts, from local community to university level.

Make your payment below and the editor will contact you to receive your work and begin your tutoring session. Any enquiries can be sent to editor@longexposuremagazine.com.


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Call for Submissions: Illustrations

Further opportunities at Long Exposure Magazine.
Long Exposure is looking to put together a list of artists to work with frequently who can respond to the writing published in the magazine, through painting/illustration, photography and other visual art forms, to be featured alongside the creative writing pieces in each issue. This is an opportunity for regular publication and promotion. If you are interested in this project please contact editor@longexposuremagazine.com with a brief introduction and a sample of your work or links to some examples. You can see the type of work the magazine has published so far here.

Long Exposure Issue 4: Call for Submissions

For the next issue, Long Exposure is opening up submissions to fiction, specifically very short fiction of 700 words or less. In previous issues we explored traditional short forms such as the haiku (Issue 2), and how an economy of language and sharpness of observation can heighten the impact on the reader by using a minimum of words.

Definitions for this type of fiction are various, and as such our criteria are broad. Whether your pieces lean towards a fluid and poetic style or want to focus on delivering an engaging narrative in a tight space, we would love to read your work.

As usual we are open to poetry submissions on any style or theme, but with a particular interest in the Ekphrastic genre or work which combines text and image, as well as to photography and art work and collaborative projects between writers and artists.

See previous issues for the type of work we have published to date.

If you have an idea for an essay or article, particularly on the relationship between creative writing and the visual arts, contemporary poetry and poetics, or the arts in education and society, contact the author to discuss.

All submissions and enquiries to: editor@longexposuremagazine.com

Full submissions guidelines.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Long Exposure Magazine, Issue 3 Now Available

The new edition of Long Exposure Magazine is now available!

Featuring an international selection of new creative writing, photography and visual art.

Access it here:

Long Exposure Magazine, Issue 3, July, 2016.

LE 3 New

Review: Insatiable Carrot by Judy Kendall

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Insatiable Carrot by Judy Kendall (Cinnamon Press, 2015)

For many writers, the garden, as a natural environment partly shaped by the individual’s personality, has maintained a considerable attraction. W.H Auden writes in his poem ‘Moon Landing’, ‘…give me a watered, lively garden, remote from blatherers/about the New’, asserting a preference for the tangible, domestic space in place of man’s progress into new territory. Composed in the latter part of the poet’s life, the simplicity of looking out on a stretch of tended land he could call his own represented a retreat from the accelerated intensity of the modern world. It also provided a security Auden had rarely been afforded, a sense of belonging.
Judy Kendall, in turn, employs her poetry to articulate a connection with the land, how the tactile and physical work of maintaining a garden, and the attention this requires, can be channelled into poetry, and may in fact embody the same characteristics.
The poems form observations of the continuous processes of life happening outside ourselves, from the slow progress of growing vegetables to the shriek of an owl at night. Subsequently, many examples draw from features of the Haiku form, with a focus on individual moments of action or stillness. Movement and a sense of the dynamic are key throughout, with the text moving fluidly over the page, resisting constraints or predictability. Through this, Kendall communicates elements both of her gardening and writing processes, and the essential relationship between them. The division between human activity and the natural world, and the poet’s resistance to this, is succinctly but strikingly probed in the line:

‘garden house divide
civilization –
as thin as that?’

-From ‘V
erge’

Throughout there are experiments which offer new challenges to the reader in this immensely varied collection, displaying Kendall’s exploration into the use of visual poetry and typography, and increasing the reader’s engagement, as they become involved in bringing its nuances to the surface. There is a huge creative energy and vibrancy behind the work, and its range is broad, spanning lyric poems, such as traditional sonnets, one or two-line fragments, arrangements with a variety of fonts, and examples where the text is effectively double exposed in appearance, as in ‘A little hedge-cutting?’, where this innovation potentially mimics the vibration of operating an electric hedge trimmer.
As a result, the poems are ambitious in their desire not only to represent experience in language, but to communicate some of the fundamental elements of the activity or object observed through maximising the poems potential, and what can be achieved with the written word on the page. The text works to provide more immediate and multi-sensory data of the experience than a simple re-telling.
In this way the poems, through their innovation, suggest a return to the source, a quest to assist us in remembering our place in the interconnected and co-dependent environments we inhabit.

Daniel Williams

A selection of Judy Kendall’s work is included in Long Exposure Issue 2, you can access it here.

Purchase a copy of ‘Insatiable Carrot’ here.

Four Tanka-Art Pieces, by Andja Petrovic

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Bio: an’ya is the haigo (haiku nom de plume) of Andja Petrovic. an’ya loosely translates to “a peaceful light in the moonless night.”

an’ya is cattails Principal editor for the United Haiku and Tanka Society (UHTS), and was voted one of the top ten haiku poets in the world by her peers in 2011.

She has won world-class awards and honors for her haiku and other verse forms from Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Germany, India, the UK, Brazil, and the Balkans.

Her work has been published in numerous international publications and anthologies. She and has been editor-in-chief of haigaonline, Moonset, the Tanka Society of America newsletter and the Haiku Society of America (HSA) 2011 anthology and is a winner of the HSA Merit Book Award. She is a founder and President of the Oregon Haiku and Tanka Society.

Long Exposure Magazine, Issue 3: Call for Submissions

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Submissions are now open for our third issue!
So far, the magazine has been fortunate enough to engage with and publish fascinating collaborations between creative writing and the visual arts, and we continue our interest in this type of project, whatever media is involved. We are always open to new projects being brought to our attention, and if you feel your work may be suitable for publication in the magazine or would like to enquire further then don’t hesitate to contact the main e-mail address at: editor@longexposuremagazine.com.
Alongside direct collaboration between art forms, the magazine continues to publish striking and innovative contemporary poetry, photography and other visual art in its own right, from practitioners at any stage of their careers. You can view our general submissions guidelines here: https://longexposuremagazine.com/submissions/
Both previous issues can be accessed online and free of charge, so if you have an interest in this field and would like to see the style and range of previously published work, we would greatly appreciate your support in reading Long Exposure’s output to date.
We look forward to receiving your work, and to continuing to explore the possibilities for contemporary arts.

To keep up to date with the progress of the magazine and our activities, follow Long Exposure on social media:

Facebook: Long Exposure Magazine

Twitter: @longexposuremag

Long Exposure Magazine, Issue 2: Digital Release

The new edition of Long Exposure Magazine is ready! Featuring an internationally diverse range of creative work in a variety of forms. Access it here: http://joom.ag/g6Ob

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Please enjoy the issue and share!

Support Long Exposure on social media:

Facebook: Long Exposure Magazine

Twitter: @longexposuremagazine

Long Exposure Magazine, Issue 2, Upcoming Release

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The second issue of Long Exposure Magazine will be made available online from this Friday, 19th June.

The edition is focused on a variety of eastern poetic and artistic forms, and features the collaborative work of Ron Rosenstock and Gabriel Rosenstock, combining haiku and photography, a sequence based on the art of Hiroshige, several examples of Haiga art work, visual poetry and more.

Keep updated here at the Long Exposure website, or follow the project on social media:

Facebook: Long Exposure Magazine

Twitter: @longexposuremagazine

Haiku in Translation, by Gabriel Rosenstock and Mariko Sumikura

lantern

foirfe amach is amach –
ciúnas an laindéir
ar a chrúca

utterly perfect –
the silence of a lantern
on its hook

Gabriel Rosenstock
(Composition in Irish Gaelic and English)

まこと見事な―
フックにかかった
ランプの沈黙

Mariko Sumikura
(Japanese Translation)

Long Exposure Cover

Provisional cover for the upcoming issue, featuring Haiga art work by Gabriel Rosenstock and Ion Codrescu. Submissions for our Eastern poetic forms specialism as well as other textual and visual work remain open. See our submissions guidelines for further details.

‘Remember’: A New Haiku by Tracey Walsh

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Personal effects
repatriated jumble
remains remaindered

Part of Long Exposure’s ‘Looking Back’ project for National Poetry Day.

Bio: Tracey Walsh has recently had work featured in Long Exposure. She tells us about the background to this poem:

Walter Walker (an uncle of my dad, also Walter Walker) enlisted in the army in 1915, aged 17 (he told them he was 19). He was killed in action in France on 14 April 1917. The image shows one of several documents, found when researching the family tree, that deal with the ‘admin’ of his death. Another form sent to his mother, Harriett, asked her to choose a personal inscription for his gravestone in the war cemetery in France (We Shall Meet Again).
Four of Harriett’s children served in the Great War. Walter’s brother, Edward, died a year to the day after him, 14 April 1918. He has no grave, personal effects or admin forms, just his name inscribed on a memorial stone at Loos, France.

A New Haiku by Tracey Walsh

Webbed garden spider
strung badminton net fashion
your luncheon is served

Bio: Tracey Walsh has been enjoying life since early retirement in 2013. Indulging a lifelong love of crime fiction by starting a book review blog, she has also discovered a new interest in photographing local Lancashire countryside and wildlife. This is Tracey’s first attempt at poetry since school days.