Gabriel Rosenstock on Haiku

Gabriel Rosenstock discusses the  philosophy of Haiku and the ability of the form to disrupt everyday ways of seeing and thinking.

‘Emptiness’, his collaborative work with American Photographer Ron Rosenstock, is out now from Long Exposure Press.

Emptiness: Reviewed by Philip Gross

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‘The richness of this book lies not in any one person’s contribution, but in the fertile space between them – between word and image, between languages, between word and silence, between landscape and light.’

Continue reading “Emptiness: Reviewed by Philip Gross”

2 Years of Publishing

Long Exposure Magazine has now been publishing for 2 years!

During this time the magazine has been fortunate enough to publish a fantastic range of poetry, photography, visual art and critical work from around the world. Many thanks to each contributor and reader who has been involved so far.

Issue 4 will add sharp and engaging short fiction to this output, featuring more writers and artists than any previous issue.

These are exciting times as we look to expand the magazine and above all promote high-quality creative work and those who are producing it.

 

Poetry Tutoring at Long Exposure

Long Exposure Magazine is now offering feedback and guidance on a selection of your poetry. For an introductory fee of £10 you will receive rigorous feedback and editorial advice on a set of up to 5 poems through e-mail correspondence.

Editor Daniel Williams holds undergraduate and postgraduate degrees in literature and creative writing and has published poetry widely on-line and in print, including at Cadaverine, Ink, Sweat, And Tears, and Envoi. Alongside his work in editing and publishing, he has experience of teaching creative writing in a variety of contexts, from local community to university level.

Make your payment below and the editor will contact you to receive your work and begin your tutoring session. Any enquiries can be sent to editor@longexposuremagazine.com.


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Call for Submissions: Illustrations

Further opportunities at Long Exposure Magazine.
Long Exposure is looking to put together a list of artists to work with frequently who can respond to the writing published in the magazine, through painting/illustration, photography and other visual art forms, to be featured alongside the creative writing pieces in each issue. This is an opportunity for regular publication and promotion. If you are interested in this project please contact editor@longexposuremagazine.com with a brief introduction and a sample of your work or links to some examples. You can see the type of work the magazine has published so far here.

Readings from Issue 3, by Keith Moul

Hear Keith Moul read four prose poems featured in Issue 3.

To read Keith’s work along the photography they respond to, access Issue 3 here.

Long Exposure Issue 4: Call for Submissions

For the next issue, Long Exposure is opening up submissions to fiction, specifically very short fiction of 700 words or less. In previous issues we explored traditional short forms such as the haiku (Issue 2), and how an economy of language and sharpness of observation can heighten the impact on the reader by using a minimum of words.

Definitions for this type of fiction are various, and as such our criteria are broad. Whether your pieces lean towards a fluid and poetic style or want to focus on delivering an engaging narrative in a tight space, we would love to read your work.

As usual we are open to poetry submissions on any style or theme, but with a particular interest in the Ekphrastic genre or work which combines text and image, as well as to photography and art work and collaborative projects between writers and artists.

See previous issues for the type of work we have published to date.

If you have an idea for an essay or article, particularly on the relationship between creative writing and the visual arts, contemporary poetry and poetics, or the arts in education and society, contact the author to discuss.

All submissions and enquiries to: editor@longexposuremagazine.com

Full submissions guidelines.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Long Exposure Magazine, Issue 3 Now Available

The new edition of Long Exposure Magazine is now available!

Featuring an international selection of new creative writing, photography and visual art.

Access it here:

Long Exposure Magazine, Issue 3, July, 2016.

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Christmas Photographs: A New Poem by Lesley Burt

Family history told through
various sofas, hairstyles,
decorated pine trees;

children changing heights
to stand beside Santa in
different stores and towns;

one where, laughing, we all
strum inflatable guitars
brought home from Memphis.

One where, on the day,
I could not see that my mother
already looked like a ghost.

Long Exposure Magazine: Front Cover Opportunity

Long Exposure Logo

For our next issue, Long Exposure Magazine is seeking photography or visual art based on the theme of ‘Movement’. The representation of movement, such as the play of light, the movement of animals or the actions of figures, have been a long standing preoccupation for the techniques of creative writing and the visual arts. The theme is open to new possibilities and can be interpreted in any way you choose.

A selected image or art work will then be chosen to feature as the front cover of Long Exposure Issue 3. Submissions to: editor@longexposuremagazine.com
As always, we look forward to viewing your work!

To view the type of work we have featured to date, read our previous issues here.

For the latest updates on the progress of the magazine and to view new content, support Long Exposure on social media:

Twitter: @longexposuremag
Facebook: Long Exposure Magazine

Four Tanka-Art Pieces, by Andja Petrovic

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Bio: an’ya is the haigo (haiku nom de plume) of Andja Petrovic. an’ya loosely translates to “a peaceful light in the moonless night.”

an’ya is cattails Principal editor for the United Haiku and Tanka Society (UHTS), and was voted one of the top ten haiku poets in the world by her peers in 2011.

She has won world-class awards and honors for her haiku and other verse forms from Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Germany, India, the UK, Brazil, and the Balkans.

Her work has been published in numerous international publications and anthologies. She and has been editor-in-chief of haigaonline, Moonset, the Tanka Society of America newsletter and the Haiku Society of America (HSA) 2011 anthology and is a winner of the HSA Merit Book Award. She is a founder and President of the Oregon Haiku and Tanka Society.

Long Exposure Magazine, Issue 3: Call for Submissions

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Submissions are now open for our third issue!
So far, the magazine has been fortunate enough to engage with and publish fascinating collaborations between creative writing and the visual arts, and we continue our interest in this type of project, whatever media is involved. We are always open to new projects being brought to our attention, and if you feel your work may be suitable for publication in the magazine or would like to enquire further then don’t hesitate to contact the main e-mail address at: editor@longexposuremagazine.com.
Alongside direct collaboration between art forms, the magazine continues to publish striking and innovative contemporary poetry, photography and other visual art in its own right, from practitioners at any stage of their careers. You can view our general submissions guidelines here: https://longexposuremagazine.com/submissions/
Both previous issues can be accessed online and free of charge, so if you have an interest in this field and would like to see the style and range of previously published work, we would greatly appreciate your support in reading Long Exposure’s output to date.
We look forward to receiving your work, and to continuing to explore the possibilities for contemporary arts.

To keep up to date with the progress of the magazine and our activities, follow Long Exposure on social media:

Facebook: Long Exposure Magazine

Twitter: @longexposuremag

Long Exposure Magazine, Issue 2: Digital Release

The new edition of Long Exposure Magazine is ready! Featuring an internationally diverse range of creative work in a variety of forms. Access it here: http://joom.ag/g6Ob

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Please enjoy the issue and share!

Support Long Exposure on social media:

Facebook: Long Exposure Magazine

Twitter: @longexposuremagazine

Long Exposure Magazine, Issue 2, Upcoming Release

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The second issue of Long Exposure Magazine will be made available online from this Friday, 19th June.

The edition is focused on a variety of eastern poetic and artistic forms, and features the collaborative work of Ron Rosenstock and Gabriel Rosenstock, combining haiku and photography, a sequence based on the art of Hiroshige, several examples of Haiga art work, visual poetry and more.

Keep updated here at the Long Exposure website, or follow the project on social media:

Facebook: Long Exposure Magazine

Twitter: @longexposuremagazine

Two Poems by Marianne Szlyk

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At the Water’s Edge

after Cezanne, “At the Water’s Edge” (c. 1890)

Resisting the hot wind, this house at the water’s edge
retreats beneath the whir of trees.

Their dry brushstrokes are blue like water or sky
and green as the end of spring.

But mostly they are the colors
of canvas, earth, and parched leaves.

The sky is a haze of brushstrokes, a wash of turpentine,
smoke to the water’s edge.

Hills loom behind the house;
they are mirages made of thinned paint.

More buildings appear, shimmers in the haze,
reflections in the water.

No swimmer, no boat breaks the surface,
more mirror for land and sky than home for fish and weeds.

But the house’s heart is dark and sweet
with sage and lavender, with the scent of grass and lake

protecting its guests from the hot wind, the drought,
and the smoke to the water’s edge.

Birch Trees in North Carolina

Seen from the window of the slow train south,
the needle-thin trunks glint
the way the odd, white threads do
in a quilt of blues, browns, and greens.

I do not recognize all of these trees,
but I know the birch.
Its peeled bark is snow clinging to spring.
Its leaves are wind chimes.
Its roots clutch at the stone wall
between long-gone pasture and forest.

I see this birch in Carolina,
not where I expected it,
but here among the rows
of oak and pine, beside
pools of water, part of
this quilt of sky, earth, and vine.

Bio: Marianne Szlyk is a professor at Montgomery College and the editor of The Song Is… Recently, she published her first chapbook, Listening to Electric Cambodia, Looking at Trees of Heaven, with Kind of a Hurricane Press: http://barometricpressures.blogspot.com/2014/10/listening-to-electric-cambodia-looking.html Her poems have appeared in a variety of online and print venues, including ken*again, Of/with, bird’s thumb, and several anthologies by Kind of a Hurricane Press. She hopes that you will consider sending work to her magazine. For more information about the spring/summer contests, see this link: http://thesongis.blogspot.com/2015/04/contests-for-springsummer.html

Renoir at Les Collettes: A New Poem by Byron Beynon

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The cicadas already
conduct the sound of the day.
Early conversation in a garden
with olive trees and a view
towards the Mediterranean.

The optimism you had –
being an old man
with crippling arthritis –
for life, health,
the beauty and vigour it could afford.

Inside the house your studio
with armchair, easel,
brushes and frames,
the quiet edges of the room.

The hushed strokes of passing
time, the depth of eye
as figures walk by
flooded in red-golden light,
the sensuality touching
a disclosure of heat.

Bio: Byron Beynon lives in Swansea. His work has appeared in several publications including Kentucky Review, Planet, The Independent, Poetry Wales, The Blue Moon Literary and Art Review (California) and the human rights anthology In Protest (University of London and Keats House Poets).  He has given talks about “Poetry and the Mirror of Art”, how paintings have been used to inspire writers. Collections include Cuffs (Rack Press), Human Shores (Lapwing Publications, Belfast) and The Echoing Coastline (Agenda Editions).

Image: ‘The Farm at Les Collettes’, by Auguste Renoir. Date: 1908-1914. Oil on canvas. Property of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Haiku in Translation, by Gabriel Rosenstock and Mariko Sumikura

lantern

foirfe amach is amach –
ciúnas an laindéir
ar a chrúca

utterly perfect –
the silence of a lantern
on its hook

Gabriel Rosenstock
(Composition in Irish Gaelic and English)

まこと見事な―
フックにかかった
ランプの沈黙

Mariko Sumikura
(Japanese Translation)

Negro Quarter, Tupelo, Mississippi, March 1936: A New Poem by William Doreski

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Negro Quarter, Tupelo, Mississippi, March 1936

The barn-slab of board and batten
must be a house: tin roof propped
above the porch, four over four
window, wood shingles clumsy
as a mouthful of store-bought teeth.
The whole thing slants to the left,

toward a courthouse white against white sky.
The slim black man in neat black suit
leaning against the building’s tilt
holds the entire scene together.
Beyond him, a small clapboard shack,
a few twists of wire, and the long wall

well beyond which the courthouse looms.
But where is the black man looking?
What’s around the corner and why
doesn’t he acknowledge the camera,
an eight by ten Deardorff, pointed
squarely between his shoulder blades?

You’d think anyone in Tupelo
in 1936 would sense
the threat, the long lens piercing
otherwise impassable distance
to center this man in a city
he may have little cause to love.

Bio: William Doreski’s work has appeared in various online and print journals as well as in several collections, most recentlyThe Suburbs of Atlantis (AA Press, 2013). This poem is part of a larger sequence based on the photography of Walker Evans. To read more of William Doreski’s work keep updated on the progress of the forthcoming issue:

Facebook: Long Exposure Magazine

Twitter: @longexposuremag

Long Exposure Cover

Provisional cover for the upcoming issue, featuring Haiga art work by Gabriel Rosenstock and Ion Codrescu. Submissions for our Eastern poetic forms specialism as well as other textual and visual work remain open. See our submissions guidelines for further details.

Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Self Portrait: A New Poem by Eric Nicholson

Self Portrait in Hell

I cannot find myself
in a threatening form with bird’s head. I stand
naked on a beach.

I was of two selves
and met my other self walking
towards me down a familiar street.

Art’s created from heart’s blood.
I paint Self Portrait in Hell,
a blood vessel bursts in my eye.

My relationship with Tulla ends
in violence and I lose a finger
joint from my left hand.

I do not know which to prefer,
the truth and anguish of art,
or the anguish of each day.

I’m sitting by a window,
my disfigured ‘hand of destiny’
clearly framed.

Another portrait in another room,
the space behind me shining through
my physical body.
Eyes of fire glow in the window pane.

I smell the resin
from the tall pines in the forests
of my childhood.

Each moment the door shuts.

I carefully measure the slow decline
into infirmity and old age.
I’m staying at Asgardstrand Hotel.

I walk with my hazel stick among
the violets and primroses in the perfumed
brilliance of spring.

The sunshine glances
off the south face
of Hardangerfjord. My mountain of mankind
rumbles in the distance.

Now the waterfall’s rushing
in my ears.

Bio: Eric Nicholson is now retired. He worked as an ESOL teacher and in other fields of education. Now in his retirement he enjoys countryside conservation, writing and walking. His work has previously been published in www.neutronsprotons.com,www.literaryorphans.org and www.emptysink.com. He blogs on http://www.erikleo.wordpress.com

More of Eric’s work is forthcoming in Long Exposure, Issue 1.

Image: Self Portrait in Hell by Edvard Munch, oil on canvas, 1903. Property of the Munch Museum, Oslo, Norway.

Night in the City: A New Poem by James Bell

you can almost hear a siren’s distant howl
his cigarette is fresh and will take a while to smoke –
she will stand and wait for an answer

their window is closed against the night air,
noise and car fumes – they prefer their own temperatures
and aromas, half undressed or dressed

her perfume stronger; she wears a black skirt
and bra for heat rather than warmth – the red mask
hooked on the window frame is for a perspective

to see through any party masquerade
that has been or is yet to be – while
both sets of eyes are locked together

they see each other with the same expression – question
whether resolution will arrive before dawn

Bio: James Bell has published two poetry collections, the just vanished place (2008) and fishing for beginners (2010), both from tall-lighthouse. He lives in Brittany where he contributes articles and photography to an English language journal and continues to publish poems nationally and internationally. His recent print appearances include Tears In The Fence, Elbow Room, The Journal, Shearsman, The Stony Thursday Book, Under the Radar and Upstairs at Du Roc.

Two Poems by Lesley Burt

Edward Hopper

The label on my suitcase …

… reminds me I do not belong.
Outside, sky darkens over a line
of could-be-anywhere mountains.

Electric light casts shadows around
plain walls, plain carpet, plain curtains;
and the chair with no cushion

where I drop my wrap; perch
on the king-size bed, careful
not to rumple its dull coverlet;

turn sideways from my Buick
parked by the window. Wait.
Anticipate that knock at the door.

(After ‘Western Motel’, Edward Hopper, 1957, Yale University Art Gallery)

Continue reading “Two Poems by Lesley Burt”

Remember Breton: A New Poem by Mary Jacob

Breton

White paste, skewed lips, hospital green
you have been drained of blood
your heart clenched tight around your throat
your hair is an oil slick, a shield, a shadow
the line down the centre of your face
jags left and right, dodging bullets
your ear is a walking cane
your shoulders an encampment
asteroids your eyes

Continue reading “Remember Breton: A New Poem by Mary Jacob”

‘Remember’: A New Haiku by Tracey Walsh

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Personal effects
repatriated jumble
remains remaindered

Part of Long Exposure’s ‘Looking Back’ project for National Poetry Day.

Bio: Tracey Walsh has recently had work featured in Long Exposure. She tells us about the background to this poem:

Walter Walker (an uncle of my dad, also Walter Walker) enlisted in the army in 1915, aged 17 (he told them he was 19). He was killed in action in France on 14 April 1917. The image shows one of several documents, found when researching the family tree, that deal with the ‘admin’ of his death. Another form sent to his mother, Harriett, asked her to choose a personal inscription for his gravestone in the war cemetery in France (We Shall Meet Again).
Four of Harriett’s children served in the Great War. Walter’s brother, Edward, died a year to the day after him, 14 April 1918. He has no grave, personal effects or admin forms, just his name inscribed on a memorial stone at Loos, France.

Looking Back: For National Poetry Day

In preparation for National Poetry Day (2nd October) Long Exposure is drawing on the theme of ‘remember’, requesting submissions of new work in response to photographs or images which document history, both personal and otherwise, and which allow a shift from the present into another space or time. We feel strongly that there is a depth and variety to images, especially those of our past, which is able to bring something unique to light. We are invested in the value of poetry and believe in its capacity to make concrete the experience of remembering, of being taken back, of recording or re-recording our impressions or responses. Our histories can provide luminous material for poetry, and it is the writing of this which we wish to encourage and bring forward, as well as the links between picture and word.
Poems are welcome in any style or form, although they should adhere to the standard submissions guidelines. As always if the image which has inspired a particular piece is available we would love to see how it and the text are interacting, so please send them too; otherwise we would welcome some further context to gain an insight into what encouraged the writing, and why it matters to you.
All submissions can be sent to editor@longexposuremagazine.com. A selection of submissions will appear on our sites as part of our engagement with National Poetry Day.

‘You should always be taking pictures, if not with a camera then with your mind.’- Isaac Marion